jonesenstein

Jonesenstein
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2001-07-15 22:26:31 (UTC)

3-19-00

Sunday, March 19, 2000
It’s been a few days since she came over, but I
think it’s pretty safe to say that I like Lindsey a lot,
she likes me a lot, and I think we’re going to be together
for a while.
On Friday she came over ‘round 4 and we were just
hanging out. Since I didn’t think she wanted a repeat of
earlier in the week (we sat around for about 6 hours and
then made out. I didn’t mind it. I think she’s just fun
to hang out with), we went out.
We went to Frazoli’s (Italian place. Good
breadsticks, not a whole lot else) and hung out there for a
while when we decided to go to a movie (which is right down
the road). After about an hour and a half in the Italian
Eatery of choice by non-Italians, she asked if we could
leave (in a girly way, “I don’t think they’ll let us sit
here for another two hours.” Of course, she is different
in every single other way I know about girls, so maybe it
wasn’t a signal). Since there was no place to go, we went
to Meijer’s and hung out for about an hour and a half.
She actually had a good time. It’s customary not
to do Couch Party thing with girls, but she actually had
fun doing NOTHING for hours with me (I must admit though,
as you know, I am one of the most fun people to do nothing
with). We sat on a swing in the middle of Meijer’s and
whenever an employee came by I talked about buying it since
we just won the lottery and needed a swing on the porch so
we could watch the little ‘uns.
Sorry if this explanation seems boring. I have
been reading Tom Jones by Henry Fielding for about 2 hours
now and that level of boring rubs off on people.
Anyhootch, we went to see The Cider House Rules
after we had a little too much fun at Meijer’s (she kept
teasing me by looking at all of this black underwear (but
not really underwear) stuff and asking if she’d look good
in it.
I was considering taking her back to my Shag Pad
right there. But I didn’t. I promised a movie and I
delivered.
The movie, by the way, I didn’t quite understand.
I mean, it was pretty good, but it was called The Cider
House Rules and I was trying to find the definition of the
title (I might have to watch it again).
It’s about a kid who is a little too happy in
life. He’s an orphan and grows up in an orphanage, where
the main warden (I guess is what you’d call him, I have no
idea what his title would be) happens to be a doctor who
does abortions and deliveries and everything. Anyway, he
teaches the main character everything he knows and the kid
learns to be a doctor by age 21 (although no degree or
anything). This doctor always tells him that one needs to
be useful, that he taught him to be a doctor because that
was his use, blah, blah, blah. Anyway, some people come by
for an abortion (which was illegal in the 40’s, when this
film takes place) and he goes with them. He ends up living
on an apple farm with a whole bunch of black folk, of which
he has never seen, in a Cider House. There are rules
posted in the icier house but no one knows how to read
until he gets there. When he does get there, they ask him
to read it, and the head cider house guy, saying that
they’ve never known what the rules were before and they
gotten along just fine, stops him. Someone that doesn’t
live in that house made those rules, so they shouldn’t be
obeyed. Rules should be made up as one lives.
Anyway, he falls in love with someone he shouldn’t,
he performs an abortion that almost everyone agrees should
be done (a sharecropper has incest with his daughter), and
eventually has to move away from the apple farm.
I’m not sure if the rules of the cider house we
analogous with what the doctor said. The doctor doesn’t
live in the real world, yet he makes up rules for the main
character. When the main character follows his own rules
he is much happier. Then again, no one in the cider house
obeyed the rules of the house and 2 died, and one ran away
and had an abortion.
Of course it could mean that the cider house was an
analogy about the orphanage saying that the doctor, who
constantly lived there for 40 years (or however long, I was
staring at Lynn sometimes) was the only one who could
really make the rules, not the Board of Trustees or
whomever makes up the rules.
I think that’s it. You can only make rules for
your environment and your own life. Everyone in the movie
had a decree of some sort.
Like the head cider mill guy always asked, “What’s
your business?” as if a man is defined by his job.
The doctor always said, “One has to be of some use.”
The girl always said, “I’m not good at being
alone,” and “let’s wait and see.”
The only one who never said anything was the main
character, who finally chose to go back to the orphanage.
He was under everyone’s influence throughout the whole
movie, and finally, in the end, he chose the life that he
thought he could do best.
I think he adopted the doctor’s viewpoint though,
or maybe he adopted the best parts of everyone (he said “my
business is doctor,” he said, “there’s no more waiting and
Seeing,” and he said the same thing the doctor always said
to the children at night, “goodnight you princes of Maine,
you kings of New England”).
I don’t know; I’m not too bright.
Anyway, I give it *** and maybe and additional */2
for present company.
What was I saying?
Oh. Yeah.
I think Lindsey’s great. I’ve told everyone but my
parents (I don’t know why). Harris thinks she has to be
desperate, Dan thinks I’m making her up, and Jaime doesn’t
want to talk about it anymore.
I got some supportive friends.
Anyway, I’m gonna go drink something. I is thirsty
and Evilynn gave me a sore throat.


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