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Filme Noi 2010
Scheduled for release May 19, 2006,
Columbia Pictures’ The Da Vinci Code is
an adaptation of the controversial book
by the same name. Criticized by
historians and the Catholic Church, the
2003 novel by Dan Brown was a huge hit
for many readers. A work of fiction,
Brown’s accurate descriptions of
historical works of art help bring the
thrilling plot into sharp focus. Fans
have eagerly anticipated the release of
the movie adaptation, when the code will
be cracked on the big screen.
Directed by Ron Howard, the cast
features such big names as Tom Hanks,
Ian McKellen, and Audrey Tautou.
Moviegoers will go on a thrilling
journey through Paris, beginning at the
famous Louvre where many of Da Vinci’s
works are displayed, before finding
themselves in merry old England across
the Channel. The 2003 book reveals a
plot instigated by the Catholic Church
to hide some of the truths about the
life of Jesus Christ. The book’s
popularity breathed new life into
Christian myth and legend, and after the
movie debuts fans will no doubt find
themselves more curious about the
history of Christianity.
The movie promises to slowly unveil
clues in many of Da Vinci’s paintings,
revealing a mystery protected by a
secret society for more than two
millennia. And though the movie is a
screen adaptation of the book, there
could be some changes now that the story
is up on the big screen. Fans will have
to wait and see how the mystery of The
Da Vinci Code unfolds.
The Da Vinci Code promises to be
thrilling ride for fans both old and
new. Strong acting and direction will no
doubt be the core of this exciting
flick, which will fascinate viewers and
keep them guessing with each new clue
that is revealed. Finally, the popular
novel will come alive in the theaters
when the code is cracked this Spring.

Filme Noi Scandals of Hollywood
These days it seems as if some Hollywood
celebrity is caught in a scandal every
other day, and in each case the press
corps swarms to the event like pigs to
slop. But it's not as if any of these
scandals represent something new.
Hollywood folks have been getting caught
in scandalous behavior involving theft,
murder, or other misdeeds since the
beginning of the industry.
We're not talking about Hugh Grant or
Pee-Wee Herman. Even those are too
recent for this site. No, we need to go
back further, to the early days of
Hollywood, where we find (roughly in
chronological order) the follow juicy
scandals:
* Back in 1920, when an actress named
Olive Thomas died of poisoning, all
kinds of rumors surfaced regarding the
last few hours of her life, and
questions are raised regarding her
relationship with Jack Pickford and life
insurance policies taken out on her the
year before.
* In one of the most famous scandals of
the era, actor Roscoe "Fatty" Arbuckle
was accused of rape and murder in 1921,
and it ruined his career, despite the
fact that he apparently was innocent,
railroaded by the Hearst newspapers.
* Director William Desmond Taylor was
shot to death in 1922. His murder was
never solved, and there has been much
speculation about the possible identity
of the killer, even including luminaries
such as Mack Sennett and Rudolph
Valentino, but a site called Taylorology
has kept the mystery alive, along with a
lot of other related material.
* Handsome but almost forgotten actor
Wallace Reid died in 1923, after a long
struggle with morphine addiction brought
about by his studio's need to keep him
working despite injuries sustained in an
on-location accident.
* Charlie Chaplin was hounded by
red-baiters and tax-collectors to the
point where he left the United States
and lived in Switzerland. He was also
well-known for his sexual activities;
one biographer claimed that Nabokov's
"Lolita" was inspired by Chaplin's
relationship with Lita Grey.
* Jean Harlow's life was filled with
scandals, in particular the suicide of
her second husband, Paul Bern, not to
mention her relationships with
gangsters, nude photos taken at the age
of 17, and a reported abortion of a
child fathered by William Powell. Winona
Ryder is a saint compared to Harlow --
or at least her public persona!
* Swashbuckling actor Errol Flynn was a
colorful and controversial character who
liked to drink, fight, and fool around,
was tried three times on statutory rape
charges, and was even accused of being a
Nazi sympathizer!
* Actress Thelma Todd, known as the Ice
Cream Blonde, died mysteriously in 1935
of carbon monoxide poisoning, and
although her death was ruled a suicide,
there were many who thought she was
murdered.
* Silent film actress Margaret Campbell,
was murdered in 1939 by her son with her
former husband, German-born actor Josef
Swickard. She was sexually assaulted and
bludgeoned to death with a hammer. The
son was also charged with 2 other
murders -- a Russian dancer, who was
bludgeoned to death, and actress Delia
Bogard, who survived the attack.
Swickard died a year later from natural
causes. He was falsely rumored to have
jumped from the Hollywood sign.
* In 1950, Ingrid Bergman, after having
a child out of wedlock with director
Roberto Rossellini, was denounced by
Senator Edwin Johnson, who said she
should be banned from the country. All
was later forgiven.
* In 1958, Lana Turner's daughter
Cheryl, fearing that her mother's life
was in danger, fatally stabbed her
mother's former boyfriend Johnny
Stompanato, who also happened to be a
mobster. The death was called
justifiable homicide.
* Marilyn Monroe's death in 1962 is
still the object of much discussion,
most of it centering on the Kennedys.
* Director Roman Polanski's wife Sharon
Tate was a victim of the madman Charlie
Manson, and he was later convicted of
statutory rape and fled the country to
avoid jail.

Filme Online This disturbing story was
offered by one of the regular members of
the About Classic Movies Forum. This is
an edited version.I started collecting
films in the 1960s, although my interest
in them dates back to my childhood in
Brooklyn, N.Y. My neighborhood was
called the Bushwick/Ridgewood section.
It was a fairly poor section of
Brooklyn, dominated by American-Italians
and American-Germans. In fact we had one
theater called the Willoughby, which
showed only Italian films, and the
Wagner, which showed only German films.
I think it was these two theaters that
tweaked my interest in foreign films. In
later years it's pretty much where I
learned to try and understand most of
the two languages, since my mother and
father never taught me Italian.
Metropolis, by Fritz LangAfter I had
been collecting 16mm film for a few
years, my mother's older brother Jimmy
and his wife came to visit my wife and I
in Long Island, and of course to see my
two daughters also, since he lived in
New Jersey and we did not see each other
too often. I had changed one room in my
house to a projection room, with a
custom-made screen. My Uncle Jim was
very impressed.
He then told me about his days with
General Patton in WW II. Although he
never spoke of the battles, what he did
tell that day would have an impact on my
film collecting. It seems that after the
invasion of Sicily, when the towns and
villages were secure, my uncle was
chosen to remain behind, because he
spoke Italian with a Sicilian dialect.
He was with other officers of Patton's
army group who also spoke Italian. While
they were appointing civilians to
village posts as mayors, magistrates,
etc., an order came from the higher-ups
to gather any Italian or German motion
pictures. If the films looked like
newsreels, they were to be saved, to be
used in possible war trials. All other
motion picture films, both 35mm and
16mm, were to be destroyed, burned!
My uncle was part of this detail. They
would go into theaters and film
warehouses, strip the film from the
metal reels, put the film in huge mounds
and burn it all. It seems the Allies,
namely the Americans, did not want any
Fascist films to linger around where
they could be shown again. It did not
make any difference whether the title
was a comedy, a drama, or a historical
film. They were all burned. My uncle
said many were also silent. He estimated
that thousand upon thousands of feet of
film were destroyed, and they burned
quickly. That was just in Sicily. My
uncle and many of his men adored General
Patton. As a Sgt. my uncle requested
that he re-join General Patton. Since
the war was heading into the winter of
1944, his request was approved, and he
fought in the Battle of the Bulge,
getting frostbite on both legs in the
process. When Patton entered Germany, my
uncle was given light duty. Among his
duties was what he did in Sicily: Gather
up German film, save the newsreels, and
burn everything else. The Russians and
British were to do the same thing in
their areas. The reels were stripped of
all the film and thrown onto a big truck
for scrap metal, and huge fires were set
to destroy German films, the same as in
Sicily. To me this was as bad as the
Nazi book burning, because I felt that
films were a form of history and art!
Today, many of the films from Italy and
Germany that remain from the 1920s
through 1945 were obtained from neutral
countries and mostly from private
collectors like you and me. While our
film industry races against time to save
our films from turning to dust, an
entire culture of films was destroyed
because of war... films by Blasseti,
Gallone, Allesandrini, DeSica, Murnau,
Lang, Von Sternberg, Pabst, Sirk, and
Trenker... destroyed in one minute by a
fire on purpose. Thank goodness that
films like Metropolis, The Cabinet of
Dr. Caligari, Emperor of California and
the original 1943 version of Titanic
survived in neutral countries and our
own film libraries. Through private
collectors in Italy, Scipione L'Africano
(1937) was found in a private collection
and restored to digital quality. This
film boasts a cast of over 40,000 extras
and has never been seen on American
television. Hopefully some day it will.
Other landmark films are now being found
in private collections, such as Roberto
Rossellini's first direction, La Nave
Bianca (aka The White Ship) (1942), and
his second, Una Pilota Ritorno (aka A
Pilot Returns) (1942). If anything,
these films were anti-war films,
especially Mussolini's supposed
masterpiece of pro-war propaganda,
Scipione L'Africano, which showed the
degradation of war. This film is now
available in DVD and digital video from
International Historic Films. A warning,
though: It is cut by one-half hour and
dubbed in English; you have to go to
Europe to get the uncut version as I did.
That's the story that very few people
have ever heard about our destruction of
Italian and German films. I'm sure the
same thing took place in Japan. However,
I'm also sure that the Nazis and the
Fascists did the same thing to when they
marched into conquered territory. What a
waste war is... lives lost and cultures
destroyed. Let's hope it never happens
again.

Don't miss out, learn more: Filme 2010 ,
Filme Online , Filme Online , Filme
Online , Filme 2010 .From the moment
somebody figured out that the new medium
of "moving pictures" could be used to
show images that might not be suitable
for all ages and all lifestyles, the
movement toward movie censorship began.
It continues today, with the recent
passage by the House of Representatives
of legislation mandating huge increases
in fines for tv and radio broadcasts of
what they define as "indecent" material.
It's only a matter of time before they
get around to looking at movies as well.
So I felt it might be a good time to
take a look at the "Hays Code" to
determine what it was and how it
resulted from attempts by primarily
religious interests to control what was
shown on the screen. It was created in
1926 and formally adopted in 1934 by The
Motion Picture Producers and
Distributors of America, and informally
known as the Hays Code after its author,
former Postmaster General Will Hays. The
Code went far beyond simply prohibiting
nudity and swearing in films; it
basically attempted to impose an entire
fabric of principles on movie-makers.
There are those who argue that the Code
forced filmmakers to be more creative in
how they showed sex and violence on
screen, resulting in some very
interesting and amusing moments on film
during the 30 years it was in effect.
While this point of view has a certain
validity, it still doesn't justify what
essentially amounts to censorship and a
violation of the First Amendment rights
of movie artists. The Code was replaced
in 1966 by the MPAA ratings system,
which attempts (not always successfully)
to restrict who may see a film (and
therefore where and when it can be
shown), but does not prohibit any films
from being made or shown, as long as the
producers don't mind lower profits!
What was the Hays Code? I've reprinted
it in its entirety so that it can be
seen how invasive it really was (and why
movie audiences regularly booed the Code
logo when it appeared on screen before a
film was shown).
The Hays Code
Here are some other Web pages where you
can get further information about the
Code and its impact on movies over the
years, as well as other information
about film censorship.
- Bright Lights Film Journal - "Warner
Brothers in the Pre-Code Era"
- Bright Lights Film Journal - "The Bad
Girls of MGM, 1932"
- Good Vibrations - "Hooray for
Hollywood: Sex and the Hays Code"
- AboutGayMovies.info - "Gay Movie
History: Censorship Starts"
- The Hollywood Thirties - Gary
Jackson's history of the 1930s in Hollywood.
- HUAC and Censorship Changes - Article
by Michael Mills.
- MediaKnowAll - Censorship
- Time: 80 Days That Changed the World -
"July 1, 1934 - Movies' Moral Crackdown"
- Wikipedia - Encyclopedia entry: The
Production Code

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