Graham Sons Interiors

Graham Sons Interiors

Graham Sons Interiors

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Interior Graham's
She was born in Nairobi and received her early
education in both India and Kenya. She moved to
England in 1971 to continue her training in
graphic art. In 1974-1975, she visited Nigeria and
Kenya to study traditional hand-built pottery
techniques. She also traveled to San Ildefonso
Pueblo, New Mexico to observe the making of
blackware vessels. In 1976, Odundo received a BA
from St. Joseph's College of Art and Design. She
then earned a masters degree at the Royal College
of Art in London. She taught at the Commonwealth
Institute in London from 1976 to 1979 and at the
Royal College of Art in London from 1979 to 1982.
She lives and works in Surrey.

On the Greek island of Santorini are some of the
earliest finds dating to the third millennium BC,
with the original settlement at Akrotiri dating to
the fourth millennium BC excavation work continues
at the principal archaeological site of Akrotiri.
Some of the excavated homes contain huge ceramic
storage jars known as pithoi.

Services Graham & Sons Interior :Wedgwood is
credited with the industrialization of the
manufacture of pottery. His work was of very high
quality: when visiting his workshop, if he saw an
offending vessel that failed to meet with his
standards, he would smash it with his stick,
exclaiming, "This will not do for Josiah
Wedgwood!" He was keenly interested in the
scientific advances of his day and it was this
interest that underpinned his adoption of its
approach and methods to revolutionize the quality
of his pottery. His unique glazes began to
distinguish his wares from anything else on the
market. His matt finish jasperware in two colours
was highly suitable for the Neoclassicism of the
end of the century, imitating the effects of
Ancient Roman carved gemstone cameos like the
Gemma Augustea, or the cameo glass Portland Vase,
of which Wedgwood produced copies

Graham And Sons Interior Graham's
The Moche cultures that flourished on the northern
coast of modern Peru produced modelled clay
sculptures and effigies decorated with fine lines
of red on a beige background. Their pottery stands
out for its huacos portrait vases, in which human
faces are shown expressing different emotions —
happiness, sadness, anger, melancholy — as well
for its complicated drawings of wars, human
sacrifices, and celebrations.

There is a strong tradition of studio artists
working in pottery and ceramics in the United
States. It had a period of growth in the 1960s and
continues to present times. See Many fine art,
craft, and contemporary art museums have pieces in
their permanent collections, and exhibit them.
Beatrice Wood was an American artist and studio
potter located in Ojai, California. She developed
a unique form of luster-glaze technique, and was
active from the 1930s to her death in 1998 at 105
years old. There are ceramics arts departments at
many colleges, universities, and fine arts
institutes in the United States.

Graham & Sons Interior :Middle Preclassic Late
Preclassic Early Mayan ceramics stemmed from a
past that began even years before the Maya became
a group. Originally, the early Maya used gourds
cut into useful shapes to create vessels to carry
liquids and foodstuffs. These portable and durable
gourds made excellent containers. The first
ceramics closely resembled gourds and many were
decorated with rocker stamps and simple slips.
During the Late Preclassic period, many of the
ceramics took on appendages of tetrapod mammiform
supports. These supports were four legs underneath
the pot holding it up. Characteristic cream-on-red
stripes colored these unique vessels.

Interior Graham's Tin-glazed pottery, or faience,
originated in Iraq in the ninth century, from
where it spread to Egypt, Persia and Spain before
reaching Italy in the Renaissance, Holland in the
16th century and England, France and other
European countries shortly after. Important
regional styles in Europe include:
Hispano-Moresque, maiolica, Delftware, and English
Delftware. By the High Middle Ages the
Hispano-Moresque ware of Al-Andaluz was the most
sophisticated pottery being produced in Europe,
with elaborate decoration. It introduced
tin-glazing to Europe, which was developed in the
Italian Renaissance in maiolica. Tin-glazed
pottery was taken up in the Netherlands from the
sixteenth to the eighteenth centuries, the potters
making household, decorative pieces and tiles in
vast numbers, usually with blue painting on a
white ground. Dutch potters took tin-glazed
pottery to the British Isles, where it was made
between about 1550 and 1800. In France, tin-glaze
was begun in 1690 at Quimper in Brittany, followed
in Rouen, Strasbourg and Lunéville. In the 18th
century, Josiah Wedgwood formulated a white
earthenware body from which he could make light
and durable tablewares. As these were almost as
white as tin-glazed pottery and better in other
ways, they replaced it in the 19th century. There
has been a revival in the twentieth century by
studio potters.

About Interior Graham's The Moche cultures that
flourished on the northern coast of modern Peru
produced modelled clay sculptures and effigies
decorated with fine lines of red on a beige
background. Their pottery stands out for its
huacos portrait vases, in which human faces are
shown expressing different emotions — happiness,
sadness, anger, melancholy — as well for its
complicated drawings of wars, human sacrifices,
and celebrations.

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