Search Box Suggestions

Search Box Suggestions

Search Box Suggestions

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Reputation is the opinion (more technically, a
social evaluation) of the public toward a person,
a group of people, or an organization. It is an
important factor in many fields, such as
education, business, online communities or social
status.

Reputation can be considered as a component of the
identity as defined by others.

Reputation is known to be a ubiquitous,
spontaneous and highly efficient mechanism of
social control in natural societies. It is a
subject of study in social, management and
technological sciences. Its influence ranges from
competitive settings, like markets, to cooperative
ones, like firms, organisations, institutions and
communities. Furthermore, reputation acts on
different levels of agency, individual and
supra-individual. At the supra-individual level,
it concerns groups, communities, collectives and
abstract social entities (such as firms,
corporations, organizations, countries, cultures
and even civilizations). It affects phenomena of
different scale, from everyday life to
relationships between nations. Reputation is a
fundamental instrument of social order, based upon
distributed, spontaneous social control.

Cho and Garcia-Molina proved the surprising result
that, in terms of average freshness, the uniform
policy outperforms the proportional policy in both
a simulated Web and a real Web crawl. The
explanation for this result comes from the fact
that, when a page changes too often, the crawler
will waste time by trying to re-crawl it too fast
and still will not be able to keep its copy of the
page fresh.

To improve freshness, the crawler should penalize
the elements that change too often. The optimal
re-visiting policy is neither the uniform policy
nor the proportional policy. The optimal method
for keeping average freshness high includes
ignoring the pages that change too often, and the
optimal for keeping average age low is to use
access frequencies that monotonically (and
sub-linearly) increase with the rate of change of
each page. In both cases, the optimal is closer to
the uniform policy than to the proportional
policy: as Coffman et al. note, "in order to
minimize the expected obsolescence time, the
accesses to any particular page should be kept as
evenly spaced as possible". Explicit formulas for
the re-visit policy are not attainable in general,
but they are obtained numerically, as they depend
on the distribution of page changes. Cho and
Garcia-Molina show that the exponential
distribution is a good fit for describing page
changes, while Ipeirotis et al. show how to use
statistical tools to discover parameters that
affect this distribution. Note that the
re-visiting policies considered here regard all
pages as homogeneous in terms of quality ("all
pages on the Web are worth the same"), something
that is not a realistic scenario, so further
information about the Web page quality should be
included to achieve a better crawling policy.

Services Suggestions Search Box :SEO Hierarchy of
Needs

There's a hierarchy to be considered when
developing any SEO campaign. To help businesses
and marketers apply this strategy of
prioritization, the SEO Hierarchy of Needs shows
the relative place of search engine optimization
tasks.

View the SEO Hierarchy of Needs in interactive
flash, or download the chart in PDF.

Box Suggestions Search
One aspect of the online identity management
process has to do with improving the quantity and
quality of traffic to sites that have content
related to a person. In that aspect, OIM is a part
of another discipline called search engine
optimization with the difference that the only
keyword is the person's name, and the optimization
object is not necessary a single web site; it can
consider a set of completely different sites that
contain positive online references. The objective
in this case is to get high rankings for as many
sites as possible when someone search for a
person's name. If the search engine used is
Google, this action is called "to google someone".

If the search engine supports multiple languages,
a common initial step during tokenization is to
identify each document's language; many of the
subsequent steps are language dependent (such as
stemming and part of speech tagging). Language
recognition is the process by which a computer
program attempts to automatically identify, or
categorize, the language of a document. Other
names for language recognition include language
classification, language analysis, language
identification, and language tagging. Automated
language recognition is the subject of ongoing
research in natural language processing. Finding
which language the words belongs to may involve
the use of a language recognition chart.
Format Analysis

Box Suggestions Search :Site owners started to
recognize the value of having their sites highly
ranked and visible in search engine results,
creating an opportunity for both white hat and
black hat SEO practitioners. According to industry
analyst Danny Sullivan, the phrase "search engine
optimization" probably came into use in 1997.

Early versions of search algorithms relied on
webmaster-provided information such as the keyword
meta tag, or index files in engines like ALIWEB.
Meta tags provide a guide to each page's content.
Using meta data to index pages was found to be
less than reliable, however, because the
webmaster's choice of keywords in the meta tag
could potentially be an inaccurate representation
of the site's actual content. Inaccurate,
incomplete, and inconsistent data in meta tags
could and did cause pages to rank for irrelevant
searches. Web content providers also manipulated a
number of attributes within the HTML source of a
page in an attempt to rank well in search engines.

Box Suggestions Search Search Engine Optimization
and Web Usability Considerations in Creating Title
Tags

The perfect title will balance all four purposes
described above and will meet the technical
guidelines explored below:

1. All titles should be typed in Title Case (or
Proper Case). This is the most often overlooked
error we've found when using the web. An excellent
resource for learning title case capitalization
rules is Writer's Block - Writing Tips -
Capitalization in Titles. By the way, your headers
should be using Title Case as well.

There are exceptions to the Title Case or Proper
Case rule. In the case of FAQ pages, it is
allowable to use the original question as the
title to the page. In that case, title case is not
necessary.

2. For nonfiction or reference websites, titles
should be written to clearly indicate what is
available on the page.

3. Every page must have a unique title. Do not put
the same title on every page of your website. (See
purpose 3 above.)

4. The title must be able to stand on its own and
clearly communicate the contents of the page to
the reader. You must give the reader context. A
title like "Home" or "About Us" when displayed in
search results or bookmarks tells the reader
nothing about the contents of the page. Remember,
the reader is simply seeing a list of titles. When
a visitor bookmarks your site or adds your site to
their favorites menu, the title of your page
becomes the title of their bookmark. Think about
your own bookmarks. How many times have you had to
edit the titles so that you would know what your
bookmark contained? Jacob Nielsen provides some
good illustrative examples of strong and weak
titles as well as general tips in his article,
Microcontent: Headlines and Subject Lines
(Alertbox Setp. 1998).

5. Home page titles present unique requirements.
The home page introduces your organization and is
almost always your best contender in a search
engine optimization contest. Home page titles
should clearly indicate what is available on the
page, AND for the purpose of web credibility they
should clearly indicate what organization is
represented on the page. In other words, you need
to include the name of your organization in the
title tag of your home page! Not doing so can
significantly lower your Web credibility.

Search Box Suggestions Services One aspect of the
online identity management process has to do with
improving the quantity and quality of traffic to
sites that have content related to a person. In
that aspect, OIM is a part of another discipline
called search engine optimization with the
difference that the only keyword is the person's
name, and the optimization object is not necessary
a single web site; it can consider a set of
completely different sites that contain positive
online references. The objective in this case is
to get high rankings for as many sites as possible
when someone search for a person's name. If the
search engine used is Google, this action is
called "to google someone".

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